MIXTAPE: On The Tune Mixtape Vol. 5

On The Tune Mixtape Vol. 5

It’s certainly been a while between mixtapes, but hopefully this is a triumphant return to form! We’ve got something for everyone with this one. Guitar-based songs, softer tracks, a Talking Heads cover, sample-based electronic songs, hip-hop mash-ups, acoustic ditties, and some post-rock to finish everything up.

Plus, it’s all completely legal. I asked every single artist or their management if I could use the tracks. No guilty conscience for anyone involved. It feels nice, doesn’t it?

Enough of my ramblings though. Feel free to peruse this fine tracklisting and download the mixtape at your leisure. Happy listening!

P.S. Cover art is by the incredibly handsome Michael “Sea Monkeys” Forrest.

And don’t forget to like On The Tune on Facebook!

Download

Size: 131.09 MB

Tracklist:

1. Winter Street – A Little More

2. The Moniters – Lights Go Down

3. The Panda Band – The Fix

4. The Deer Republic – Feel Like Dancing

5. Millions – Those Girls

6. Udays Tiger – Machine

7. Tim Fitz – Disposable Youth

8. The Dead Leaves – This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody)

9. Buckley Ward – So Pretend

10. Anton Franc – Letting Go

11. Air France – It Feels Good To Be Around You

12. Lion & the Lotus – Vistas De Oro

13. Gotye –  Somebody That I Used To Know (Phatchance Hip Hop Remix) Remixed by One Above

14. The Trouble With Templeton – Bleeders

15. Cheer Advisory Council – Coach

16. Solkyri – This Can’t Wait!

17. Tom Day – Home

Don’t know how to unzip stuff? Download 7zip here.
Don’t know which download link to click? I don’t know what .msi files are either. Do you use Windows? Try this one.

REVIEW: Death From Above 1979 – "You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine"

Death From Above 1979’s first and last album, "You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine", gathered quite a devout following for the short-lived dance-punk duo. The band were only active for around 5 years, from 2001 to 2006, but they clearly left quite a large imprint on their fans. With drummer Sebastien Grainger holding the primary vocal role, and Jesse F. Keeler on the synths and bass, the line up of DFA1979 is certainly an interesting point of discussion, and without a lead-guitarist of any kind, it definitely contributed to their unique sound.

Deeply distorted grinding bass-lines dominate on the album, and layered on top of loud and aggressive vocal lines, the reason behind being classified as "dance-punk" becomes apparent. Yet their sound holds something different about it. The infectiousness inherent in fast – sometimes messy, sometimes simple – melodies is drawn out from where it so often hides from even the most persevering of musicians. Not all bands can pull off something so stylistically different, yet so catchy.

Discordant riffs sometimes make songs a little difficult to listen to, but DFA1979 are one of those bands that are good, but become so much better once you know what you’re getting into. "Romantic Rights" is a clear stand-out track, as is the title track, and although the album as a whole is stylistically similar, when it clocks in at 35 minutes, it doesn’t seem to bore. When you’re in the mood for it, it’s a fun album, full of out there riffs. It’s a shame that it slightly all merges together at times, leaving little distinction between one track and the next. That said, there’s little room for a slow-pace, and it thunders along at an alarming rate for two musicians. They clearly deserve the following they have.

Score: 6/10