BRAND NEW/TOUR: Drawn From Bees – “Of Walls and Teeth”

Brisbane rockers Drawn From Bees have only just released their latest single “Of Walls and Teeth”, and you can take a listen to it right over here! It’s the first single from the bands sophomore album, The May King and His Paper Crown, which is set for release in 2012. Drawn From Bees bring together some fairly conventional guitar sounds on this single (the solos are neat though), but it’s the cool use of vocal melodies and harmonies that really make it stand out.

You can pre-order the single on iTunes from the 12th of August, and it’s officially available on the 26th.

Lately the band have toured the US (even got in a few shows at SXSW!), and they’ve just announced a set of Australian dates throughout October.

Check them out on tour if you get a chance.

Sat 1 Oct – Yah Yahs, Fitzroy
Sat 8 Oct – Masquerade Ball @ The Zoo, Fortitude Valley
Sun 9 Oct – Caloundra Music Festival, Caloundra
Sat 15 Oct – Oxford Art Factory Gallery Bar, Sydney
Fri 21 Oct – The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba
Sat 22 Oct – Restless @ The Loft, Gold Coast
Wed 26 Oct – Nanna Night @ Vinyl Bar, West End
Sat 29 Oct – The Railway Club, Darwin

Just to whet your appetite with another song of theirs (this is one of my favourites), here’s a great video from the band.

REVIEW: It’s Just Vanity – “Here’s What You Remember From A Coma”

It’s Just Vanity hail from the United States. They mix relaxing, ambient post-rock, with what sounds like early-wave emo guitar stylings, and their first full-length is going to be given away for free very soon.

Lyrically “Here’s What You Remember…” is nothing short of evocative. With an opening line like “And nothing is as sad as watching you lay latent, so desperate for a hand, and god, I hate this,” how could it be anything but? Moving between the subtler, softer lines, and the throaty emotional choruses, they paint a picture for anyone paying enough attention. Granted, it is easy to zone out at points, just letting it pass you buy, but if you pay attention to the poetic and sincere lyrics you’ll be drawn into something that’s difficult to let go of.

“You keep sucking me in, I feel the pull of a chicago wind. I’m not here to be there for you.”

“I want me to fix you, so you can fix me too.”

“In the future my life will be one sidewalk.”

It really is the massive contrast here that helps set the pace and keep the songs interesting. Instead of your traditional post-rock sound, one second the guitar melodies are floating along, and the next you’re being rushed at by a pounding vocal line and crushing guitars. It lends an air of excitement to the band. Instead of waiting for some crescendo to build up, waiting for beautiful orchestral string lines to explode and release the tension, you get something different. Something just as worthy, just as interesting, and just as musical, yet something different.

“Here’s What You Remember…” is definitely a refreshing change, and a different take on established styles. Though I won’t claim this type of music hasn’t been done before  (because it probably has), it’s certainly new to me. The lyricism, the tension, and the relaxing atmosphere blend together to create something that’s really pretty cool.

Verdict: Positive

You’ll be able to grab a free download of “Here’s What You Remember From A Coma” from here from the 2nd of July to the 8th of July. Make sure you give it a listen.

REVIEW: Death From Above 1979 – "You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine"

Death From Above 1979’s first and last album, "You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine", gathered quite a devout following for the short-lived dance-punk duo. The band were only active for around 5 years, from 2001 to 2006, but they clearly left quite a large imprint on their fans. With drummer Sebastien Grainger holding the primary vocal role, and Jesse F. Keeler on the synths and bass, the line up of DFA1979 is certainly an interesting point of discussion, and without a lead-guitarist of any kind, it definitely contributed to their unique sound.

Deeply distorted grinding bass-lines dominate on the album, and layered on top of loud and aggressive vocal lines, the reason behind being classified as "dance-punk" becomes apparent. Yet their sound holds something different about it. The infectiousness inherent in fast – sometimes messy, sometimes simple – melodies is drawn out from where it so often hides from even the most persevering of musicians. Not all bands can pull off something so stylistically different, yet so catchy.

Discordant riffs sometimes make songs a little difficult to listen to, but DFA1979 are one of those bands that are good, but become so much better once you know what you’re getting into. "Romantic Rights" is a clear stand-out track, as is the title track, and although the album as a whole is stylistically similar, when it clocks in at 35 minutes, it doesn’t seem to bore. When you’re in the mood for it, it’s a fun album, full of out there riffs. It’s a shame that it slightly all merges together at times, leaving little distinction between one track and the next. That said, there’s little room for a slow-pace, and it thunders along at an alarming rate for two musicians. They clearly deserve the following they have.

Score: 6/10