VIDEO: Slow Club – “Where I’m Waking”

Slow Club

It’s a sad day when I have to send you to NME – one of the only modern publications still¬†reporting on¬†everything the Gallagher brother’s say (who, by the way, no one gives a damn about) – but alas, it is they who are premiering the new video from talented English duo Slow Club.

The video isn’t amazing and doesn’t quite have the same charm as “It Doesn’t Have To Be Beautiful“, but the song sees their writing heading in a new, albeit interesting and full direction – they still have those charismatic vocal hooks, but their sound seems less quaint and withdrawn this time (not that it was a bad thing on their debut album though!). It’ll be interesting to see what kind of sound Paradise, their sophomore release, has. It’s out on September the 12th.

Check out the video over here.

REVIEW: Death From Above 1979 – "You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine"

Death From Above 1979’s first and last album, "You’re A Woman, I’m A Machine", gathered quite a devout following for the short-lived dance-punk duo. The band were only active for around 5 years, from 2001 to 2006, but they clearly left quite a large imprint on their fans. With drummer Sebastien Grainger holding the primary vocal role, and Jesse F. Keeler on the synths and bass, the line up of DFA1979 is certainly an interesting point of discussion, and without a lead-guitarist of any kind, it definitely contributed to their unique sound.

Deeply distorted grinding bass-lines dominate on the album, and layered on top of loud and aggressive vocal lines, the reason behind being classified as "dance-punk" becomes apparent. Yet their sound holds something different about it. The infectiousness inherent in fast – sometimes messy, sometimes simple – melodies is drawn out from where it so often hides from even the most persevering of musicians. Not all bands can pull off something so stylistically different, yet so catchy.

Discordant riffs sometimes make songs a little difficult to listen to, but DFA1979 are one of those bands that are good, but become so much better once you know what you’re getting into. "Romantic Rights" is a clear stand-out track, as is the title track, and although the album as a whole is stylistically similar, when it clocks in at 35 minutes, it doesn’t seem to bore. When you’re in the mood for it, it’s a fun album, full of out there riffs. It’s a shame that it slightly all merges together at times, leaving little distinction between one track and the next. That said, there’s little room for a slow-pace, and it thunders along at an alarming rate for two musicians. They clearly deserve the following they have.

Score: 6/10