FEATURE: One last post: This is it.

This was originally going to be posted on my Optus Sound Scribe blog: To Kill A Harpsichord. However, posting closed early last night, and I didn’t get a chance to publish it. So here it is.

P.S. Normal service will resume at On The Tune in a few weeks. I’m taking a short break.

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The final post.

I’ll keep it short – if you haven’t read my open letter to everyone yet, it’s over here.

I’d like to say a few more things before this finishes up.

Thank you to everyone who has worked on this project, written alongside me, supported me, or encouraged me to do my best – I owe you one. Epsecially the media institutions like 99.7 Star FM and The Irrigator, who gave me some very helpful publicity.

This has been a fantastic experience – thank you to Optus for making it all possible. I’ve made new friends that I’m sure I’ll keep in touch with for a long time, and I’ve been lucky enough to read some brilliant work from a lot of you.

There are a huge amount people that are close to me I could namedrop to thank, although I can’t possibly list you all. If you have signed my petition, commented, shared the link to my blog, or helped me out in anyway – thank you. It means a lot to me.

That said, I would like to mention a few special people.

Firstly, my parents, for putting up with me constantly blogging and taking time off from study to work on this – thank you. It means a lot that you’ve supported me in being a Scribe, especially during my HSC.

Secondly, my close friends who helped with putting up posters, collecting photos, gathering petitions, and general online support – Alex Hingston, Katelyn Yeo, and Mykal Forrest (especially for Mykal’s artistic poster designs!).

Lastly, I’d like to thank Lian Drinan. She has shared the link to my blog on Facebook constantly since day one, commented on my posts, and helped make a lot of what we’ve all achieved possible. She was a huge help in the Capture Your Community competition, and came up the street with me to help out every time I needed a hand – whether it was putting up posters, or collecting votes. I’ve been incredibly lucky to have a great friend like you helping me throughout this, and I don’t think this can be said enough – thank you.

Good luck to the rest of you in the competition, and in the future – I’m sure a lot of you will achieve some amazing things, whether they’re to do with journalism, music, or both!

All the best,

Jeremy

FEATURE: Anyone up for some post-rock?

So you’re up around midnight. Browsing the internet, chatting to friends, reading a book, killing time just because you don’t feel like sleeping, whatever. Then you encounter the inevitable question: what do I listen to next?

It’s too late to put on something loud and aggressive. You’re too tired to put on something bouncy or poppy. You’re feeling too apathetic to want to listen to lyrics. You just want something nice to listen to.

I feel it’s times like these where post-rock is the only answer. Or, you know, something classical or orchestral or whatever if you’re into that too. But post-rock can be pretty good.

Anyway, short of putting on some Sigur Rós (I can vouch for “Takk…”, it’s quite nice, though it’s quite lengthy at just over an hour), you can try some work by Explosions in the Sky.

EitS are an American post-rock band, and their second-most recent album “The Rescue” is available for free from their website.

The band recorded it and mixed it in only two weeks. It contains eight tracks (“Day One”, “Day Two”, “Day Three”, etc.), each of which was written in a day. The next 6 days were spent mixing the record. It was inspired by an incident on tour when their van broke down, and they had to wait 8 days for it to be fixed. The band were broke, and ended up spending the 8 days in some nice person’s attic.

For me, post-rock can sometimes be a bit like background music. I know that sounds bad, like I don’t appreciate it or pay attention to it. But usually when I listen to it, I like just letting it pass me by. Explosions in the Sky proved to be a very similar experience.

All I’ll say is this: I enjoyed it. I can’t say it’ll prove to be anything revolutionary to post-rock fans, but to anyone wanting to expand their tastes and try something new, I see no reason as to why you shouldn’t check it out.

Grab a free download here.